Monday, April 20, 2015

Book talk: 10 Bookish rules to live by [a repost]

It’s been a while since I’ve posted one of my columns here, and seeing as I’ve been whinging a lot about readers who don’t return books in the same condition it was lent to them, on Twitter, I thought I’d post this little column on book rules to live by.

Warning: Some (mostly harmless) snark ahead. :-))

The first two points are most important as they involve, and are addressed to the non-readers in our lives.

Here goes:

1) Stop interrupting us when we’ve huddled into the most comfortable spot imaginable and are completely immersed in the world between the pages.

Unless someone needs to be rushed to the hospital or the house is on fire, we will assume that any of your mortal needs can either be taken care of by you, or by the other person in the house who doesn't read.

2. Avoid trying to persuade us to get rid of books because you think there’s no space.

The floor is a space.

If you trip over a book, it’s not the book’s fault. You just need to be more careful and watch where you’re going, for goodness sake! You could damage the book you're tripping over.

The points below are for the fellow bookish folk we can all relate so well to.

3. Return books that were lent to you. No one likes a book thief.

4. Oh, and if you do bring the book back, the only coffee stains we want to see on them, are no coffee stains.

5. Don’t mock people for their choice of reading material. Every book has its place and there’s room for every kind of reader.  If you want to read that naughty bodice ripper, I say go for it.

And if you want to wax lyrical about the most obscure piece of literature out there, then by all means do it. Just as long as it makes you happy.

6. Have an opinion about a book you’ve never read? Well, aren’t you precious? By all means, love or hate a book, but if you choose to feel something about a book, shouldn’t you at least have given it a fair chance before forming an opinion about it?

Sure, some books warrant that “I couldn’t get past the first chapter feeling,” but you’d need to have opened the book for you to have that feeling, wouldn’t you?

My issue isn't with those who think a book is rubbish, but with the people who make up their mind about a book before they've sat down to actually read it. Instead what they do, is read dissertations and online columns and opinions about it, and automatically absorb those as their opinions.  

7. Try not to spoil book endings. Spoil it for yourself if you must (I know lots of people who are fond of sneaking a peek at the back), but for many people, it's not just about the journey that takes you there, but about how it all ends. No one should be robbed of that, don't you think?

8. Ditch the e-book vs paperback debate. Personally, I believe there is room for both and if e-books and e-readers are becoming more, then who am I to say “be gone with you e-menace?”

While I certainly and mostly read paperbacks (and will probably always have a preference for them), I wouldn’t get rid of my Kindle or my reading apps on my phone at all. It’s the stairs and escalator analogy over again. I like knowing that both are at my disposal.

9. Try not to think too badly of those who mess up the book-to-film adaptations.

Wait. Forget I said this immediately. Judge as mercilessly as you want.

10. Always make time to visit the library. There’s a treasure trove to be found that’s worth more than a Valentino design. Even if the physical price says otherwise.

Those are just a few of the rules in my list. Why don't you tell me about the rules you'd add to your own book manifesto?
I’d love to read what you have to say.

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